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TPS Re-Registration Period for HAITI and EL SALVADOR

January 20, 2018

TPS Re-Registration Period for HAITI and EL SALVADOR

Author: New York Immigration Attorney Alena Shautsova

Recently, DHS announced that El Salvador and Haiti will lose TPS protection. It means that hundreds of Haitians and Salvadorians will have to find a different way to stay in the US legally or depart the US.

The US government, however, provided one last extension of TPS for both countries.  TPS for El Salvador is set to expire on September 9, 2019; and for Haiti on July 22, 2019.

It is important that persons who hold TPS currently apply for re-registration timely, not to lose their status before its expiration. the re-registration period for El Salvador  and Haiti is  January 18, 2018 – March 19, 2018. 

Some TPS holders who timely applied for the re-registration for Haitian TPS are still waiting for the decisions on their re-registration applications from 2017. In such cases, a person does not have to submit a new application. But only if the re-registration was applied timely in 2017.

USCIS will issue new EADs with a July 22, 2019 expiration date to eligible Haitian TPS beneficiaries who timely re-register and apply for EADs; the same goes for Salvadorians (the effective expiration day of their EADs would be September 9, 2019).

Existing EADs issued under the TPS designation of Haiti with the expiration date of January 22, 2018, is automatically extended for 180 days, through July 21, 2018. One does not need to apply for a new EAD in order to benefit from this 180-day automatic extension. However, if one wants to obtain a new EAD valid through July 22, 2019, he/she must file an Application for Employment Authorization (Form I–765) and pay the Form I–765 fee.

The same is true for Salvadorians, only their EADs have a different expiration date according to the Federal notices.   DHS automatically extends the validity of EADs issued under the TPS designation of El Salvador for 180 days, through September 5, 2018.

For possible Immigration solutions related to the termination of the TPS status, please visit: https://www.shautsova.com/law-publications/solutions-haiti-tps-holders.html#.WmKglKinE2w.

 

 

 

 

Privacy Laws Change For Non-USC and Non-LPR

April 30, 2017

Privacy Laws  Change For Non-USC and Non-LPR

New York Immigration Lawyer Alena Shautsova

The Trump administration has announced new changes to privacy laws that will affect non US citizens and non permanent residents.  Since 2007, the government, and DHS in particular, extended privacy laws protection enjoyed by USC and LPRs to non-immigrants and immigrants (Privacy Policy Guidance Memorandum 2007-01/Privacy Policy Directive 262-12, DHS Privacy Policy Regarding Collection, Use, Retention, and Dissemination of Information on Non-U.S. Persons). Basically, the agency could not release or share information regarding a specific individual freely. It could be done only in specific situations and when  a subject of record would provide a release.  After new Executive order, the administration is changing its policies to strip non citizens and non LPRs from privacy protection. According to the Memo released on April 27, 2017, “Section 14 of E.O. No. 13,768 requires that “[a]gencies shall, to the extent consistent with applicable law, ensure that their privacy policies exclude persons who are not United States citizens or lawful permanent residents from the protections of the Privacy Act regarding personally identifiable information.” Privacy Policy Guidance Memorandum 2007-01/Privacy Policy Directive 262-12 is inconsistent with Section 14 of E.O. 13,768.”

What does this really mean? If one looks at the Memo in question, he/she will find that its language is rather convoluted and the real meaning is hidden somewhere between the lines.

Analyzing the document as a whole, one can make at lease these two conclusions:

1. No Privacy Act protection means easy exchange of collected data by any and all government participants. Like in a Red Riding Hood, the wolf had big eyes to better see the girl, here, the government opens its volts of data to better see potential deportees.

2.  The government will have free hands with regard to  collection, use, dissemination, or maintenance of personally identifiable information.  The only limitation specified in the DHS Memo is “any sharing of such information outside the agency must be compatible with the purposes for which the information was originally collected.” ” Seeking consent is always a preferable privacy practice, and consent should be sought when practical.” However, it is well known that once information is collected and available, to track the purpose of its usage is extremely hard. It is even harder to prove (for a regular person) that his/her information was mishandled and shared in violation of restrictions. And, I have never heard of a situation where a government official would reach out to a non-immigrant and ask for his/her consent prior to share his info with, let’s say, another consulate…

3. The Memo states that ” People not covered by the Privacy Act or Judicial Redress Act (JRA) (which is non USC or non LPRs) still may obtain access to records consistent with FOIA unless disclosure is prohibited by law or if the agency reasonably foresees that disclosure would harm an interest protected by an exemption.” It is in this line that many practitioners may see a problem: will their clients still be allowed to have copies of the government records pertaining to their full immigration history?

To sum it up, there come significant changes in how the government is going to collect and share information regarding non citizens and non-permanent residents. Perhaps, about citizens and LPRs as well…

 

F-1 NEPALI STUDENTS EAD

November 10, 2015

F-1 NEPALI STUDENTS EAD

Author: New York Immigration attorney Alena Shautsova

The devastating earthquake in Nepal   and its consequences affected its citizens all round the world. The U.S. government first announced that Nepali nationals will be able to apply for  TPS status in the U.S..

Now, the DHS announced that F-1 Nepali students will be able to qualify for employment authorization easier: as long as Nepali students would maintain minimum  full course requirement and experience severer economic hardship. Specifically, undergraduate students who receive on-campus or off-campus employment authorization under this notice must remain registered for a minimum of six credit hours of instruction per academic semester. A graduate-level F–1 student who receives on-campus or off-campus employment authorization under this notice must remain registered for a minimum of three credit hours of instruction per academic semester. See 8 CFR 214.2(f)(5)(v).

Other requirements that Nepali student must meet:
(1) An applicant should be a  citizen of Nepal;
(2) An applicant should be lawfully present in the United
States in F–1 nonimmigrant status on April 25, 2015, under section 101(a (15)(F)(i) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA), 8 U.S.C. 1101(a)(15)(F)(i);
(3) An applicant should be enrolled in a school that is Student and Exchange Visitor Program (SEVP)-certified for enrollment for F–1 students;
(4) An applicant should be  currently maintaining F–1 status; and
(5) should experience severe economic hardship as a direct result of the damage caused by the earthquake of April 25, 2015.

Those who already hold an employment authorization, will be able to benefit from the new changes as well. These changes will remain in effect (as of now) until December 24, 2016.

For more information, please contact our office at 917-885-2261.